Queen Elizabeth on her throne
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Queen Elizabeth on her throne

On this day 457 years ago, Queen Mary I died and Elizabeth was now the head of the English, Welsh and Irish thrones; However, she did not officially ‘take over’ until January 15th 1559. She reigned for an impressive 44 years and her reign was interesting one.

We decided to look at her reign and a little poem came to mind…

 

 

 

 

 







An interesting one that Bess,
The virginal queen of years,
Her life was filled with intrigue,
Plots, death and troublesome fears.


She never married – the only queen
Not to take a spouse,
But think dear people would you trust Love,
If Henry VIII was the leader of your house.


She didn’t start life very well,
Despite being a bit of a smarty,
Just for not being a boy ,
Daddy Henry cancelled her birth party.


To really- SERIOUSLY -put the icing
on the family cake,
He sliced her mummy’s head off
For being a devious fake.


Even when dear daddy died,
Her life wasn’t exactly bliss,
Would you be happy in London Tower,
At the demand of your threatened sis?


Despite this beginning being
jammed pack with trouble and strife,
She ended up being queen of England
For 44 years of her life.


The last Tudor on the throne
And England saw a golden age,
Of travel, theatre and Drake,
Even seeing Philip of Spain in a rage.


Unfortunately, his revenge backfired;
His Armada had a terrible defeat,
More due to the stormy weather,
Than Francis and his English fleet.


With skills in lots of languages,
To all she could converse.
Her true language was rather blue
and contained many a wonderful curse.


When Mary Queen of Scots arrived,
She caused rather a traitorous buzz,
But Bess did not despair,
Of this Catholic troublesome Cuz.


‘Poor’ Mary was shoved
towards a prison cell in a trice,
until she went too far and Lizzie said:
‘her head is for the slice’.


But Mary had the last laugh,
Which was quite a funny thing;
As Lizzie never found a mate,
 Mary’s son became England’s new king.


A Catholic and a Scottish man,
the Tudor’s reign had had its run,
James I was king and heir,
The Stuart Age had begun.